Kotlin

Bunch of updates in my OSS for Android

2015-11-08 Android, Java, Kotlin, Open source No comments

Introduction

In the last days I prepared a bunch of updates in my open-source software for Android. Most of them are bug fixes and are related to increasing robustness of the projects as well as their overall quality. I also decided to play a little with Kotlin language from JetBrains, which seems to be reasonable choice for mobile applications running on Android. Nevertheless, writing an app in Kotlin requires some additional configuration and we should remember, it’s still in beta version. If you are interested in Kotlin programming for Android, take a look at Getting started with Android and Kotlin guide from official Kotlin website. You can also take a look at one of my sample apps written in Kotlin and its configuration in Gradle.

Summary of updates

ReactiveNetwork v. 0.1.3

  • fixed bug with incorrect status after going back from background inside the sample app reported in issue #31
  • fixed RxJava usage in sample app
  • fixed RxJava usage in code snippets in README.md
  • added static code analysis
  • updated code formatting
  • added sample sample app in Kotlin

Unfortunately, in Android we cannot use Java 8 yet and code should be written in Java 7. We can do some hacks like using RetroLambda or libraries implementing part of functionalities available in Java 8 like streams, but these solutions are still hacks – not the right way. In Kotlin we can use lambdas like in Java 8. In addition, we have a lot of other cool features, which allow us to write less lines of code and detect possible mistakes while writing apps. E.g. Kotlin helps us to avoid NPEs with its additional operators like !!, which tells us that NPE can occur, so we can think of eliminating this possibility. If we don’t use this operator when we should, IntelliJ IDEA or Android Studio will warn us. Below, we can see exemplary usage of ReactiveNetwork library with Kotlin. In this code snippet, we are using so called synthetic properties from Kotlin Extensions for Android. Value connectivity_status is an id of the view defined in XML layout. We can call it directly in Kotlin code and treat as object. It’s really useful and allows us to avoid calling findViewById(...) method for every view in Activity or injecting views with additional libraries like ButterKnife or KotterKnife. It means that we can get rid of a lot of boilerplate code.

ReactiveSensors

  • fixed RxJava usage in sample app
  • fixed RxJava usage in code snippets in README.md
  • added static code analysis
  • refactored sample app and removed repetitions in code

In this project I made only changes inside the documentation, improved Gradle configuration and added another sample app. There were no changes inside the library code, so there was no need to release new library version to Maven Central Repository. Moreover, I’m going to add sample app in Kotlin for this project in the nearest future.

ReactiveBeacons v. 0.3.0

  • replaced distinct() operator with distinctUntilChanged() operator in Observable observe() method in ReactiveBeacons class
  • added permissions ACCESS_FINE_LOCATION and ACCESS_COARSE_LOCATION to satisfy requirements of Android 6
  • renamed void requestBluetoothAccessIfDisabled(activity) method to void requestBluetoothAccess(activity)
  • added boolean isBluetoothEnabled() method
  • added boolean isLocationEnabled(context) method
  • added void requestLocationAccess(activity) method
  • modified sample app in order to make it work on Android 6 Marshmallow
  • reduced target API from 23 to 22 in library due to problems with additional permissions and new permission model (it can be subject of improvements in the next releases)
  • added package private AccessRequester class
  • added sample app in Kotlin

WeatherIconView v. 1.1.0

  • added icons from 2.0 version of the original weather-icons project
  • updated compile sdk version
  • updated Gradle Build Tools version

Prefser v. 2.0.2

  • fixed bug reported in issue #70: get(...) method now returns a null value instead of “null” string when setting default value to null of String type
  • fixed RxJava usage in sample app
  • fixed RxJava usage in code snippets in README.md
  • changed code formatting to SquareAndroid
  • added static code analysis
  • improved code according to static code analysis suggestions

Kirai v. 1.1.0

  • removed formatter(...) method from Kirai class
  • added format(...) method accepting implementation of Formatter interface to Kirai class
  • added Syntax interface and HtmlSyntax class implementing this interface
  • added put(String key, Object value, Syntax syntax) method to Piece class
  • set HtmlSyntax as default Syntax implementation in Piece class
  • removed dependencies to Android SDK
  • updated project dependencies
  • applied Square code style
  • updated tests, sample app and code snippets in README.md
  • added gh-pages with JavaDoc

Any suggestions of further improvements are more than welcome as usual!

Hello Kotlin!

2015-02-07 Android, Kotlin No comments

I’ve recently played with Kotlin in order to create simple “Hello World” Android app using this new, fancy language from JetBrains. Kotlin is another programming language based on JVM, which can work with Java. It’s aim is to reduce code boilerplate and create projects faster. In my simple Android project, I’ve also used KotterKnife for injecting views. I’ve also added one simple ActivityUnitTestCase. Unfortunately, I couldn’t convert it into Kotlin, because I wasn’t allowed to call constructor of inherited class using super() method. You can read related StackOverflow thread in order to view more details. In order to use Kotlin, I followed instructions from article on JetBrains blog. I’ve also needed Kotlin plugin for Android Studio.

Check out my GitHub repository: https://github.com/pwittchen/HelloAndroidKotlin
View more samples in JetBrains repository: https://github.com/JetBrains/kotlin-examples

It’s also worth mentioning that there is a project created in Kotlin by JetBrains called Spek which is a specification framework for the JVM and you can use it for writing unit tests in the JVM projects in order to get human readable output.

Furthermore, you can read document about Using Project Kotlin for Android by Jake Wharton: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1ReS3ep-hjxWA8kZi0YqDbEhCqTt29hG8P44aA9W0DM8/.

In order to view basic code constructions in Kotlin, you can browse the following repository: https://github.com/FutureProcessing/kotlin_showandtell.

Kotlin is quite interesting language, which may be some kind of Swift for Android. Basic setup of Android project in Kotlin is definitely easier than project setup in Groovy. It looks promising and I’m looking forward to hearing about new updates concerning this language.