Month: November 2015

Reactive Live Coding during GDG DevFest 2015 in Poland

2015-11-29 Android, Conferences, Google, Java, RxJava 2 comments

I was asked to be a speaker during GDG DevFest 2015 conference in Warsaw, Poland. Of course, I accepted this invitation and prepared presentation titled “Reactive Live Coding”. Presentation covered basics of Reactive Programming, RxJava and RxAndroid. Besides my talk I’ve done live coding to show how to use mentioned libraries and basics principles of Reactive Programming in real life. I had only 20 minutes for all of that, so my time-box was very limited. Being a speaker at conference was really interesting and challenging experience, which I haven’t had before. Moreover, I could meet a lot of interesting people and hear very inspiring talks covering different topics. You can check activity from conference by browsing #devfest15pl hashtag on Twitter and Facebook event. You can also check official website of the conference at devfest.pl.

Slides from my presentation are available below.

Source code of the exemplary Android app shown and partially coded during the presentation is available at github.com/pwittchen/guitar-browser.

Picture documenting part of my short talk made by @depodefi can be found below.

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GDG DevFest organizers have done really good job and I can definitely recommend this conference to anyone interested in new IT technologies.

New release of Kirai – elegant string formatting library for Java

2015-11-22 Android, Java, Open source No comments

I’ve recently released version 1.4.0 of Kirai library. Kirai means phrase in Swahili language. It’s string formatting library written in Java. It originally started as an Android library, but it evolved to pure Java library. It’s first possibilities were basic string formatting and text formatting for Android TextViews. Now, it allows to format strings for Java, Web, Android and even Unix Terminal! Have you ever wanted to have colorful and styled text in your mobile app, website or terminal app? Now you can with an elegant and fluent API! Moreover, I’ve added test coverage supported by codecov.io. It’s really nice service, which integrates with Travis CI and is free for open-source projects. It’s available for various programming languages and build systems.

Check library source code and samples at: https://github.com/pwittchen/kirai

You can add it to your project via Maven:

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.github.pwittchen.kirai</groupId>
    <artifactId>library</artifactId>
    <version>1.4.0</version>
</dependency>

or through Gradle:

dependencies {
  compile 'com.github.pwittchen.kirai:library:1.4.0'
}

Bunch of updates in my OSS for Android

2015-11-08 Android, Java, Kotlin, Open source No comments

Introduction

In the last days I prepared a bunch of updates in my open-source software for Android. Most of them are bug fixes and are related to increasing robustness of the projects as well as their overall quality. I also decided to play a little with Kotlin language from JetBrains, which seems to be reasonable choice for mobile applications running on Android. Nevertheless, writing an app in Kotlin requires some additional configuration and we should remember, it’s still in beta version. If you are interested in Kotlin programming for Android, take a look at Getting started with Android and Kotlin guide from official Kotlin website. You can also take a look at one of my sample apps written in Kotlin and its configuration in Gradle.

Summary of updates

ReactiveNetwork v. 0.1.3

  • fixed bug with incorrect status after going back from background inside the sample app reported in issue #31
  • fixed RxJava usage in sample app
  • fixed RxJava usage in code snippets in README.md
  • added static code analysis
  • updated code formatting
  • added sample sample app in Kotlin

Unfortunately, in Android we cannot use Java 8 yet and code should be written in Java 7. We can do some hacks like using RetroLambda or libraries implementing part of functionalities available in Java 8 like streams, but these solutions are still hacks – not the right way. In Kotlin we can use lambdas like in Java 8. In addition, we have a lot of other cool features, which allow us to write less lines of code and detect possible mistakes while writing apps. E.g. Kotlin helps us to avoid NPEs with its additional operators like !!, which tells us that NPE can occur, so we can think of eliminating this possibility. If we don’t use this operator when we should, IntelliJ IDEA or Android Studio will warn us. Below, we can see exemplary usage of ReactiveNetwork library with Kotlin. In this code snippet, we are using so called synthetic properties from Kotlin Extensions for Android. Value connectivity_status is an id of the view defined in XML layout. We can call it directly in Kotlin code and treat as object. It’s really useful and allows us to avoid calling findViewById(...) method for every view in Activity or injecting views with additional libraries like ButterKnife or KotterKnife. It means that we can get rid of a lot of boilerplate code.

ReactiveSensors

  • fixed RxJava usage in sample app
  • fixed RxJava usage in code snippets in README.md
  • added static code analysis
  • refactored sample app and removed repetitions in code

In this project I made only changes inside the documentation, improved Gradle configuration and added another sample app. There were no changes inside the library code, so there was no need to release new library version to Maven Central Repository. Moreover, I’m going to add sample app in Kotlin for this project in the nearest future.

ReactiveBeacons v. 0.3.0

  • replaced distinct() operator with distinctUntilChanged() operator in Observable observe() method in ReactiveBeacons class
  • added permissions ACCESS_FINE_LOCATION and ACCESS_COARSE_LOCATION to satisfy requirements of Android 6
  • renamed void requestBluetoothAccessIfDisabled(activity) method to void requestBluetoothAccess(activity)
  • added boolean isBluetoothEnabled() method
  • added boolean isLocationEnabled(context) method
  • added void requestLocationAccess(activity) method
  • modified sample app in order to make it work on Android 6 Marshmallow
  • reduced target API from 23 to 22 in library due to problems with additional permissions and new permission model (it can be subject of improvements in the next releases)
  • added package private AccessRequester class
  • added sample app in Kotlin

WeatherIconView v. 1.1.0

  • added icons from 2.0 version of the original weather-icons project
  • updated compile sdk version
  • updated Gradle Build Tools version

Prefser v. 2.0.2

  • fixed bug reported in issue #70: get(...) method now returns a null value instead of “null” string when setting default value to null of String type
  • fixed RxJava usage in sample app
  • fixed RxJava usage in code snippets in README.md
  • changed code formatting to SquareAndroid
  • added static code analysis
  • improved code according to static code analysis suggestions

Kirai v. 1.1.0

  • removed formatter(...) method from Kirai class
  • added format(...) method accepting implementation of Formatter interface to Kirai class
  • added Syntax interface and HtmlSyntax class implementing this interface
  • added put(String key, Object value, Syntax syntax) method to Piece class
  • set HtmlSyntax as default Syntax implementation in Piece class
  • removed dependencies to Android SDK
  • updated project dependencies
  • applied Square code style
  • updated tests, sample app and code snippets in README.md
  • added gh-pages with JavaDoc

Any suggestions of further improvements are more than welcome as usual!

An Opinionated Guide to Modern Java by Parallel Universe

2015-11-05 Java No comments

Introduction

I recently read series of three articles titled An Opinionated Guide to Modern Java by Parallel Universe. It presents really interesting point of view and can be read even by non-Java developers due to its form. Non-Java developers can learn that Java can be fast, elegant and lightweight as much as other hipster technologies like Ruby, Go or Node.js. The main difference is the fact that Java is quite old and widely used technology what means it’s well tested, stable, solid, has great development and monitoring tools. Besides widely known projects, author of the articles presents some information about tools built by Parallel Universe, which are not commonly used and are less popular, but are also worth considering for modern development. E.g. he writes about so called Capsule project, which is intended to be a Docker alternative for Java and Quasar, which is interesting high level API for multi-threading with concept of actors, which is also available in Akka and Erlang. I recommend any Java and non-Java developer to read this series to learn new things and consolidate the knowledge.

Series of articles